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“You weren’t here by mistake. And each of us is a marvel in our own way. So it’s time for you to step up and burn for something.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

 

Life could have been better without pain. But, it is with pain that we learn how to hope, and it is with hope that we are able to burn. This isn’t just empty words. Listen in as Belkis Clarke-Mitcham shares her story and how this can relate to you. There’s life beyond the pain and trauma and it is within your reach. Light your fire and find the way back into your own happiness.

 

Listen to the podcast here:

 

Highlights:

02:37 Growing Up in Darkness
11:02 Walking Out Towards the Light
21:41 Make A Change in Others
26:17 How to Light the Fire in You
30:59 Burn Passionately With Belkis
 

 

Quotes:

“I think that there is an awakening that happens within you when you believe and you have faith.” –Art Costello

“You can change for the better and help catapult you into being who you really supposed to be.” –Art Costello

“Those youth are our future. And that’s why it’s so important to get the word to them that there is hope.” –Art Costello

“Trauma, hurt and pain, brokenness cannot destroy what it did not create. And it did not create the beauty in you. It does not take the validation of somebody else to see that you are worth being here.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“So you want to make sure that somebody else does not get to dictate how and when you go out.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“You can burn again and burn for something.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“Life has been threatening so beat it out of you; it is your time to reclaim it.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“Do not let the negatives of this world rob you of the opportunity to live in the light of the positive, in the rewards of the positive, you have got to give yourself a chance.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“You weren’t here by mistake. And each of us is a marvel in our own way. So it’s time for you to step up and burn for something.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“Give yourself be a chance and it might be tough, but it can get easier. And there is a life beyond the trauma life beyond the pain. Life Beyond the brokenness, life beyond the poverty and you can live beyond that.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

“Prosper, prosper and prosper in everything that you do. Just go get it.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham

 

You don’t have to live in darkness anymore. There’s hope and end for your pain. Join @myexpectation and @BCPhenRO in this passionate conversation in #abuse #trauma #depression #fire #hope #self-worth #beyondpain #burn #light Share on X

 

Trancriptions:

 

Art Costello: Welcome to Shower Epiphanies Podcast. Today my guest is Belkis Clarke Mitchum and I am so excited to have her here. Let me give you a little bit of information about her. She is a speaker, a coach does trauma transformation. She’s married to a wonderful man named John they are from the Caribbean. They live in Corpus Christi, Texas now for a short while, I think she’ll fill us in on her story. She has a tremendous amount of faith and her spiritual wisdom and the life lessons that she’s gonna teach us today will stay with us for the rest of our lives. Just can’t say enough about her. She did an incredible life it is with my pleasure that I introduce you to Belkis Clarke Mitchum.

 

“Prosper, prosper and prosper in everything that you do. Just go get it.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Thank you so much for having me on Art and for showing your space. You know, with your amazing audience, truly is a pleasure.

Art Costello: I’m glad to have you here and I can’t wait for you to tell us your story. And, and see how we can help other people transform and, and live the life they’re meant to live. And, and have you tell us your story of how you’ve overcome some incredible odds, just incredible.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Oh, you know, it is typical that at the end of the, um, I get very reflective. Well, I’m generally very reflective thinking about it, but you know, at the end of the year, you start really thinking back and I sat down today and the, you know, I reflected on the girl I used to be the woman that I’ve become in that we, I’m looking to go. I grew up in the Caribbean, I was born in the Caribbean, a tiny island call the [inaudible], but I didn’t just grow up on a small island. I grew up poor and it’s not that everybody on the island is poor because that’s far from the truth. But I grew up poor, I grew up in a big family, but we were really, really poor. I mean it was hand me downs and the books, good thing they did not change textbooks very often because then it was passed down covered in a nice thick brown paper that in jord. And so it was a lot of hand me downs and I remember I was telling my husband today that I remember there were days when hunger would hit so hard and so you’re [inaudible] to find whatever and there will be old bread that had gotten hard and you would dunk it into like milk with water or something that had been stressed with whatever little sugar you can find and say it would soften it and basically, you know, that would be a meal that would keep you for a bit and you go out to play again. And yeah, that childhood in a sense though we didn’t have much was shattered. Literally just ripped apart when there was sexual abuse, molestation, incest. 

My earliest memory is like, I was maybe about 10 years old or so. Well that’s my earliest memory of a sexual abuse, but there were touching’s and little forcing you to do certain things, you know, that had occurred earlier than that and that sent me down a path that would bring about a lot of hurts and even more hurt and more pain and more trauma into my life, into my space. And it made me wonder what kind of person I would have been had that not occurred, but we’ll get to that. And I remember I couldn’t, it’s as if I couldn’t laugh or if I did it seem forced or fake I withdraw into myself a lot. The, it’s as if the spark and the bubble that sometimes I thought was there just couldn’t come up. I did not know what happiness felt like. I remember as a teenager it I would look up the word happy and I could understand intellectually what it meant, but I could not feel it. Later on I learned to realize how much I had disconnected, disassociated. My feelings were locked away somewhere and I was just functioning on a level and I’d become really good at doing what I was told. Which is one of the things that really prepared me for allowing more abuse into my life when it seemed as if you, you don’t have a voice, you if from such a young age when that voice is taken away, you feel as if you’re just meant serve to give. So as I grew and I withdrew into myself the moment any male attention came my way, I was like, oh, maybe this would be the one who think I’m worthy of being loved. So when you got teachers who go like, oh, I remember one incident, I was grade six and the teacher said, I’m come with me, Belkis to the art supplier’s room we’re going to do art I need you to help me bring some supplies back. So I was like, oh me, really? You know, you know, exist. And I went and as soon as he closed the door, he tried to kiss me.

Art Costello: –Hmm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: And I, you know, the thing about trauma is that it really conditions you to given to the trauma. Oh, like be understanding what I’m, I’m saying. So being abused as a child made me conditioned me to think being molested, being touched, and forced it to do, to to either just lay there and take whatever was given to me that conditioned me to think that that is all that I was good for. So when this day tried to kiss me, I’m trying to push away, but meal child stronger. I just went in, I literally switched off the fight. I, I didn’t do it cause member if as if the fight just switched off and I went into the zone where it was just let whatever be, because this is what it is, it is. This is how you, what you were made for this is what you were created to accept because I could not begin to understand, how is it that everyone, every male that come across me, family, family friends, whomever, that’s…they would come into your space and everybody just saw you as a sex object. Something for the pleasure, the sexual pleasure. So here’s this teacher, and I’m like, okay, maybe the, he wasn’t the only teacher that tried that. As I grew up and I couldn’t figure out what it is about me that seems to keep drawing because it’s not like I dressed revealing because I tried to cover up as much as possible. I couldn’t figure out I just figured it was what I was made for. It had to be because if I wasn’t putting myself out there, if I was so quiet and shy and reserved, because I did not want anybody to know what what had happened with me or was happening with me, I became very reclusive life, I met a lot I escaped through books that was my salvation. But it wasn’t good enough because several times I tried to slit my wrist or drank stuff to take. As a matter of fact, when I turned 16 the day I turned 16 I was released from the hospital for my first suicidal on my birthday.

Art Costello: –Oh.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: And I had several attempts after that because I couldn’t escape the torment, the torture I felt inside I won’t who’d back I wanted to, I looked at all the youngsters, youth, teenagers, friends around me. They were so happy they were so a free is this an, I just seem always as if I was over sensitive to everything. I was always unhappy I didn’t not know how to take the knowledge of happiness that the decks, the dictionary meaning and connect it to a feeling I did not know. And I felt just like torn apart as if emotions were on one side and my intellect on the other. They saw the person and I couldn’t seem to bridge the gaps. I walked around almost divided with this hole that just go from head to my toes so it was like a little space in between never connected. And I struggled with that all through my teenage years. And we make grades that started to slip I it, and I was like, why is it that no one seemed to heal me? Dome crying out. But maybe I wouldn’t [inaudible] think that I was saying it, but I wasn’t. And so he said, I went on suffering. My mom, my mom moved to Saint Martin when I was like nine and we went, we heard, but I was old. So we went to school in Saint Kitts, but living in Saint Martin said it was like back and forth between the two islands. And I would beg her sometimes to just come home during the semester or the school term. But of course she’s working and she can’t just do that and so I felt even more abandoned. I, I just felt like there was no one to hear me. And so I tried to end it because I couldn’t make the thoughts stop the feelings, stop the depression, go away. I couldn’t make it stop.

Art Costello: What point did you, I mean I’m almost at a loss for words, thinking of the, the pain because you know, I know the pain that I’ve had in my life is nothing even close to compared to what you’ve experienced. So I guess my question is for your focus, is it, what point and what was the catalyst that brought you from that darkness to the light?

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Oh my gosh. You know, I would like to tell you that it was like a one thing that wind like boom and everything changed –

Art Costello: –[inaudible] does it.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: -no, I don’t really, have I heard any, I don’t know if I’ve heard anybody say that and then. The truth is I tried to read the self-help books that they were, that the counselors and stuff would recommend, but basically that thing just blast over me because what I wanted was a really individual to show me that, that all that stuff that forget the size that they could see beyond a body, that they could see a person no value in me, something that they could see, Oh yes, she been through this but is worthy of being loved. So I try to meet those and it wasn’t working. So, but then again, when I was about 15 [inaudible], it might’ve been before that a cousin of mine came, moved into our village. I didn’t know we were cousins, but we clicked as friends and he stood with me till today. He stood with me through thick and thin, constantly reminding me that you may not see it today, but you will. I do I love you, who you are, your spirit and you will do something great with your life and I’m here to make sure that you live to do that. He said if, and he was, he told him, if you ever feel like taking your life, just call me. And he was there if I called one o’clock in the morning, he would talk with me. Even if he got to go to work or have classes or whatever, he has always been there –

Art Costello: –Hmm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: -and that made a difference. It made me try a little bit because I’m like, okay, here he’s telling me something do. I didn’t always believe it. I didn’t always believe that he, I said maybe he just wants me to stick around for himself. I don’t know what the scenario, the cases, you know, I kept doubting because there was so many odds stacked against what he was saying. Everything else was like, no, that’s not how it was. Teachers, stepfather cousins had proved out the wise. So how is it that you now, even though I say something they claimed it’s like [inaudible] hope that it was true. So I think I gave him horrors in to, he proved himself even though he’s stood with me through –

Art Costello: –Yeah.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: -thick and thin, and I’m, he finally got some of my family members to hear what was happening at. That when they heard the story that I was being abused. Oh, good Lord have mercy. I felt like I just wanted to crawl under a rock because it became like a family, congo does something. We, everybody had to get together and talk, but nobody was asking me how I was coping.

Art Costello: –Yeah, yeah.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: It was why you didn’t say, and then after that one incident is that that one time, then it’s like, it went away. Like nobody checked t that, but he kept through and then he, he joined the US army and so there was a distance and so it was a back and forth for me. Bad relationships and I was always a faith. I grew up in the church, but I remember, I was in [inaudible] married, rushed into a marriage, trying to escape…the horror.

Art Costello: –Yeah.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Trying to find love, trying to find acceptance, looking for value somewhere that somebody would affirm it was something worth saving in me. And I heard the message in church, but I didn’t think I was good enough and I think God could love me. I couldn’t even be consistent. And I was so dirty and, and, and I was so abused and b could not pass it, that Holy God could not possibly love me. And so I gravitated and pulled away from God it was back and forth and I rushed into a marriage and he turned out to be abusive.

 

“Give yourself be a chance and it might be tough, but it can get easier. And there is a life beyond the trauma life beyond the pain. Life Beyond the brokenness, life beyond the poverty and you can live beyond that.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Art Costello: -Hmm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: I remember being well why am I here? And dragged across the floor and thrown against the wall and choked and had to sleep in the car. And it was, it was not good.

Art Costello: –Yeah.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: And yet, sorry, go again –

Art Costello: No, no, I understand.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Yeah.

Art Costello: I just, it’s unbelievable.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: And yet, I wanted to stay in the marriage because in church we would have thought that when you got married you’re supposed to stay married. So though it was killing me, this young girl just wanted to stay, but something in me. You see all of that God was, I heard from God. I heard from the self-help books I heard from my mom because my mom was trying, I just think that my mom, my mom had me when she was a teenager, so she grew as a parent. If she didn’t just have all this stuff she learned over the years but I’ve seen her done phenomenally. She admitted when she was wrong, she have learned and she have grown and she’s now my staunchest supporter and my greatest and my best friend. It makes to my husband and his cause he’s awesome. Yeah, but that marriage was, is like as if God wanted to tear out of that. But I kept holding on because of you see how we’ve been socialized.

Art Costello: –Hmm Mm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: It becomes a prison sometimes and so here, the church teachings, he was, he would have taken my life and I’m going to tell you a story and I don’t want to get rude or anything, but when he finally left, I didn’t even know he was, he wanted a divorce I heard it on the street. And then my mom called me that seemed that, heard it on the street that he was divorced in me. I didn’t know we lived in the same house.

Art Costello: –Mm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: And, I went home and I asked them, you know, and he was like, yeah, and if you don’t know why, then I won’t tell you. I’m like, what kind of closure is, is this only sense? And a couple of weeks later he would, he, I saw him being nice to me and I thought, okay, he wants to maybe make up. So we had a sexual intimacy and right after, alright, he looked at me, he cursed at me. Bleep, bleep, pick up his bags that was already pack, walked out, and never looked back.

Art Costello: Unbelievable.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: I sat outside one night…under the nice [inaudible] sky. I could never forget this. I could hear the, the ocean and I could smell the salts on the ear and I sat on that beautiful night sky in dock off the yard with a razor blade in my hand, ready to slip my wrist.

Art Costello: –Hmm.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: This was my turn in moment because…I heard it’s as if all that I had been reading and human in church and from my mom about this God, because I kept asking weird, are you show your proof to me, I don’t want to know what my mother, I want to know for myself. And I’d been begging and pleading for years dear God, please just show yourself real if you are real. And I felt like he wasn’t showing up, but that night did because I heard clear in my head, I died for humanity. You don’t need to die for anybody else.

Art Costello: That’s tremendous. I mean it’s, you know, I don’t know if you know my story, but I had a conversation with God when I was nine years old. And when God speaks to you, it is so moving in your soul. It stays with you for your life.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –Hmm Mm.

Art Costello: But there’s so much forgiveness and comfort. It comes from hearing that. I don’t know if it’s forgiveness.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Hmm Mm.

Art Costello: You know? But there’s something in it when we have this, this Epiphany, –

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –Hmm Mm.

Art Costello: -of God presenting themselves to us and we’re so, you know, sometimes I think that we have to be, so it’s such a point because you know, in my world travels and stuff, I’ve run into people that have been in war and that kind of thing. And it seems like people who experience this despair just open up like a flower, to the word the company words of what, how God speaks to us and it becomes the catalyst for them to rise up, help others. They always seem to be people who, who rise up and help others and care about other people. Do you think that that’s true in a sense?

 

“You weren't here by mistake. And each of us is a marvel in our own way. So it's time for you to step up and burn for something.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Yes it is. I believe, you know, you’re talking about that and I am smiling because it is so, you know, a lot of the persons that I’ve met who’ve really been through some hurt, some pain when they come into contact with that awesomeness of who God is. I don’t, like you said, it is a combination of forgiveness, a clarity, a peace, a love. It’s, is this complex thing that occurs that is hard to explain. It doesn’t mean that all the ills in your life disappears, but somehow there’s an element activated in you. And I believe that because we were a spiritual concept first, we were born of a spiritual line of thought and thinking and a vision of spiritual vision formulated for it God’s spirit, God’s plan, his idea of who we are. He formulated that in the spiritual realm and then added a physical being. So I believe when we come in contact with him while existent in this broken physical world, that that’s spiritual original spiritual DNA in us is activated. And I think that is what comes alive when we encounter God’s, it is this inexplicable thing that happens, –

Art Costello: –Yeah, yeah

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: -but it as if it’s, it’s, so, I don’t know if you would agree, if you felt like it was, it felt natural. It felt as if yes, this, this has always been me. I just didn’t know it just felt rewrite.

Art Costello: Yeah, I do agree with that. I think that, that, that there is an awakening that happens within you when you believe and you have faith and you, and you really start to believe. It took me, and I’m just gonna guess, but I know at least maybe 20 or 30 trips up this mountain that I used to go to, to learn to believe it. It doesn’t happen like you said, overnight.

 

“I think that there is an awakening that happens within you when you believe and you have faith.” –Art Costello Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –No.

Art Costello: It’s something that grows and it grows and it grows. And another thing when you were talking about your, your cousin being your guiding light is at a certain point in your life. You know, when I was in school, I had a teacher say to me, these, these words that just made all the difference in my life. It was my social studies teacher and he leaned over one day and he whispered in my ear, he said, aren’t you gonna be okay? You’re gonna be okay everything’s going to be alright someday and you’re going to be somebody. And that’s all he said and he walked away because I had been pretty much ostracized from my community and the kids didn’t associate with me lot a lot. And there’s a lot of different reasons that you know, we, we don’t have time to [inaudible] not it’s not about me but, but my point is those simple words from somebody can change your life, can change it for the better and help catapult you into being who you really supposed to be.

 

“You can change for the better and help catapult you into being who you really supposed to be.” –Art Costello Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Oh my gosh Art. You know what you’re saying is into just recently when I read the story of a nine year old Alabama little girl that committed suicide because she was being bullied and taunted. I started an initiative to get people to write a letter to boys and girls and I use my platform to put it before other youngsters and to encourage them. And now you’re saying this and it’s so aligns with, because I believe, and I’ve seen it too many times, you never know when the words you uttered to an individual will meet the world of a difference literally.

Art Costello: Absolutely. And I knew you were involved with helping that little nine year old girl because I saw it on your social media.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Yeah. You know, there are too many of our youth that are living with hope. We got youth that become hopeless, hopeless youth, become hopeless adults if they make it into adulthood. And I’d love to see more of a young people make it into adulthood. And I’d love to see more adults make it past the age where they’re at and the level of happiness that they’re at and the level of passion that our lack of fire, you know? So it really moved me and it is an ongoing initiative, you know, called letters to our sons and daughters and I, you know, encouraged people just gather, just let me gather these letters and I repost them on my page. But I do more than that because when I’d be with you then they were collection that comes out. And if something resonates with them, I want to know if they could walk away with that and in a tough moment, remember it.

Art Costello: Those youth are our future. I mean, –

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –Yes.

Art Costello: -and that’s why they’re so important to get the word to them, that there is hope and that there is a future out there. Even as bleak as it looks sometimes –

 

“Those youth are our future. And that's why it’s so important to get the word to them that there is hope.” –Art Costello Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –Hmm Mm. –

Art Costello: -it’s really when you stop and as you know, cause I’m 71 now and I look back on my life and when I was nine and 10 I never, that’s why I went to that mountain because I wanted to ask God what was gonna become a me. And once you start believing and have faith that everything is gonna be alright and you learn how to expect. The thing I want to teach children is to learn how to expect. Because once you learn how to expect and manage your expectations and learn how to sift through them things smooth out for you as a child, you, you really have a more direct path to get and receive what you want out of life. And it took me 65 years before I actually figured it out and that’s what I write about. But I’m working on a coloring book for preschoolers to teach them expect expectations and how to manage them. So there’s a lot of good things that we’re all doing.

 

“Do not let the negatives of this world rob you of the opportunity to live in the light of the positive, in the rewards of the positive, you have got to give yourself a chance.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –Yeah.

Art Costello: You know, as we get to time to say goodbye and wrap up, can you tell me what, what you would like to leave with everybody right now, some thought that you have that you want to share that you think is really important that could save somebody’s life?

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Oh, definitely. You know, no matter life could hit us some blows. Life could really knock us down, knock us for a loop, knock us out, give us some serious punches. And it is easy sometimes to stay in that comfort zone of low expectations, low visions for life. Because every time you rise, it’s so much effort to pick yourself up and go again. It takes so much energy and you just seem to be getting beaten back and back and back again. But you know what? Trauma hurt, pain, brokenness cannot destroy what it did not create and it did not create the beauty in you. It does not take the validation of somebody else to see that you are worth being here you are here it does not matter the circumstances on the which you got here. There are multimillion brilliant ideas out there that started in some weird, wacky, offbeat way. So no matter your weird, wacky, offbeat way that you got here, look at me my, my mom was a teenage mother who was encouraged to have an abortion, but today my mother tells me that I am a hoe of visionary, her pioneer, her piece, her friend, the one who makes her laugh and bring joy. Had she aborted me, she would’ve in her future joy of future peace. Her visionary, the person who could be the and support her so you wanna make sure that somebody else does not get to dictate how and when you go out you want to make sure that I know that divorce can our fire. I know that maybe we wanted to get a degree and we didn’t and that could outro a fire. I know that lack of finances and poverty can out our fire. I know that the struggles of life and the painful rejection that we received can out our fire, I know that abuse and trauma can out our fire. 

I know betrayal and heartbreak can out our fire, but I’m here to tell you that you can burn again and burn for something. You need to just discover what is the thing that you get up for. You want to get up and burn for. What is that dream that you have shelved? What is that self-value, that self-affirmation that you have been so afraid of embracing and holding onto because life has been threatening to beat it out of you. It is your time to be claiming, do not let life, do not let the negatives of this world rub you of the opportunity to live in the light of the positive, in the rewards of the positive. You have got to give yourself a chance when you are done living the life that everybody has dictated for you, everybody has demanded of you who will be left to live your life. You have got to give the initial person you were created to be a chance and you were here by mistake and each of us is a marvel in our own way. So it’s time for you to step up and burn for something. What is it you want to burn for and be a marvel in your environment, your specific way in your little way. It don’t have to go according to the dictates of anybody else. It’ll have to look like anybody else. People may ask you, who do you think you are? People may try to push you down and keep you locked in, but that is because there is something that disturbs them and what disturbs them is the great in you and your great don’t need to be a big splash. It could be a tiny ripple that just disturbs a thing beneath the surface, but as long as you are creating your kind of wave, you deserve to have that. We should not die it’s a travesty when we die having not lived who we were meant to be, give yourself a fair chance and it might be tough, but it can get easier and there is life beyond the trauma life, beyond the pain life, beyond the brokenness, life beyond the poverty. And you can live beyond that.

 

“Trauma, hurt and pain, brokenness cannot destroy what it did not create. And it did not create the beauty in you. It does not take the validation of somebody else to see that you are worth being here.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Art Costello: Preach it, sister preach it. Wooh man I’m so proud of you. I’m so proud of you. You just sell it so eloquently and I just –

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –[inaudible] my heart Art.

Art Costello: I know –

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: –[inaudible].

Art Costello: I know, I know. Can you tell us what is on the horizon for Belkis and where we can get a hold of you and, and anybody that wants to share with you can, can find you?

 

“So you want to make sure that somebody else does not get to dictate how and when you go out.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: Definitely you can always, well they can always find me on social media of course, but you can hop over to my website, www.belkisclarke.com you can definitely find me there. But a lot of people on social media, so that’s where a lot of people link with me. It’s usually on social media is look at Belkis Clarke and boom there and as for the horizon and I’d be happy to have you on my coming my up and coming podcasts as well. Is that definitely, and I’ve got, you know, some great stuff coming in the future, like my academy, you know, I teach people to live the life, you know, with the burn, with a passion, with the fire –

 

“You can burn again and burn for something.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Art Costello: –Right.

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: and stuff like that. But definitely the most prominenting women, I think it would be the launch of my podcast, the trauma free zone. That’s where you live in your awesomeness.

Art Costello: We look forward to it and we know that just from the conversation today, you have so much to teach and you have so much passion to teach it with. And I’m just glad that I had you on the show and I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart and I want you to know I’m always here for you and together we can overcome anything, anything

 

“Life has been threatening so beat it out of you; it is your time to reclaim it.” –Belkis Clarke-Mitcham Share on X

 

Belkis Clarke Mitcham: That is so true and I really appreciated having persons like human con is invaluable Art so I want to say thank you. Thank you to your listening audience and this prosper, prosper and prosper in everything that you do. Just go get it.

Art Costello: I will. Absolutely, and you’ve given us all great life lessons here today that I’ll stick with me particularly for the rest of my life. Thank you Belkis and I look forward to working with you in any way I can.

 

 

About Belkis Clarke Mitcham

Growing up in the Caribbean seems to be the perfect paradise for a young Belkis. But, her big family struggled in poverty, with a little food to get by. It could have been bearable until she was forced to live in darkness by abusive people. They stole her self-worth and every drop of happiness and innocence that she had. Her melancholic life moved her to end the sufferings until a glimpse of light sipped through her eyes. With that light, she walked out of her traumatic past and became an inspirational speaker, author, Transformational Spiritual Life Coach, and Motivational Teacher. Belkis Clarke Mitcham knew she had the fire in her. All she had to do was light that fire and rise from the ashes.

Connect with Belkis

Website: http://www.belkisclarke.com/
Facebook: https:/www.facebook.com/BelkisClarke/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/belkisclarke/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BCPhenRO/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/belkis-clarke-mitcham-a0093159
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu8LnfJon0kp5Bl538h2sdw

 

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